error: Invalid attempt to read when no data is present. ProgCons Call to Increase Road Safety by Scrapping Speed Cameras and Fixed Speed Limits
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Home > Article Categories > Legal Press Releases > ProgCons Call to Increase Road Safety by Scrapping Speed Cameras and Fixed Speed Limits

ProgCons Call to Increase Road Safety by Scrapping Speed Cameras and Fixed Speed Limits

The UKs Progressive Centre-Right Conservative Party, the ProgCons, today called for an urgent cross-party review of Britains speed camera and road safety regulations to refocus the priority of saving lives over raising revenue.

(PRWEB) October 10, 2005 -- The UKs Progressive Centre-Right Conservative Party, the ProgCons, today called for an urgent cross-party review of Britains speed camera and road safety regulations to refocus the priority of saving lives over raising revenue.

With particular concern raised over permanent speed cameras and hidden mobile police speed units, the ProgCons believe that the principal aim of keeping Britains roads safe has been misdirected and has become little more than another stealth tax.

It is clear that Police officers are abandoning methods of high-visibility policing to reduce drivers speed in favour of hidden methods of fine collection. said Chad Noble, founder of the ProgCons. Far from promoting road safety, the current road safety measures are not only a dangerous distraction to drivers and act as another tax but are also criminalising responsible drivers who are much more adept at adjusting their speed to appropriate levels than fixed speed limit signs.

The ProgCons are calling for a full and transparent debate on Britains road safety and speed regulations, including a review of new methods of speed restriction to take into account not just road location but weather conditions and time of day.

Clearly, someone driving along a 30 mph-limit country lane with no houses nearby at 40 mph on a dry, clear morning at 5:00 a.m. is unlikely to be a danger to any other road user or pedestrian, nor are they likely to even come across another person and yet, in the eyes of the law, they are criminals. Noble said. However, someone driving at 20 mph in a 30 mph road just outside a primary school on an icy day at 8:30 a.m. could be a significant danger to pedestrians and yet is deemed to be driving legally and perfectly acceptably. This is clearly wrong and exposes the glaring flaws in our fixed speed-limit system. Single fixed speed limits on particular roads are simply incapable of promoting road safety as they cannot take into any of the relevant information that would determine an appropriate speed for that place, at that time of day, in those weather conditions.

Of particular concern to the ProgCons, is the loss of focus on actually saving lives and reducing accidents by the continued support of road-safety methods whose safety credentials are often promoted on clear misrepresentations of official data to disguise the core revenue collection aim.

Road safety should be fair and transparent. Noble continued. It should not appear to by sneaky or devious. The current rules are inflexible and unfair. It is true to say that most drivers break the current speed limits on a regular basis but very few ever have accidents. This is simply because all but a tiny minority of drivers are perfectly capable of adjusting their speed to an appropriate level based on the road safety factors. These drivers are responsible and can adjust their speed below or above the legal fixed speed limit to take into account their location, the time of days and the prevailing weather conditions.

Simply reducing fixed speed limits, or catching and fining drivers from fixed or hidden mobile speed cameras is not, in any way an effective solution to reducing road accidents.

We need a system than is adaptable to appropriate safe driving speeds, not a one-speed-fits-all approach that does nothing to further the goal of reducing accidents. Above all, we need a system that is adaptable and highly visible to encourage road users to drive responsibly. Of course such a system will need investment as the technology, though already in use in some areas, will be more expensive than simple fixed speed limit signs, but if the goal really is to save lives and not raise money, then it will be a small price to pay.




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Steven J. Williams, P.C.
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